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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Surviving a Heat Wave in the San Gabriel Valley

7/27/2018 (Permalink)

Heat waves have been striking the San Gabriel Valley all Summer. Just like any other natural disaster, heat waves can be very dangerous!

Here are some tips to survive a heat wave:

Before the Heat Wave Hits

  • Properly install window air conditioners, sealing any cracks and insulating if necessary.
  • Check A/C ducts for proper insulation and clean filters.
  • Install awnings, blinds, or light-colored drapes and keep them closed to keep sunlight and heat out.
  • Upgrade your windows and weather-strip doors to keep heat out and cool air in.
  • Make sure your first aid kit is updated and get trained in first aid relief.
  • Have a plan for wherever you (and your family members/pets) spend time during a heat wave—home, work, and school—and prepare for power outages. Discuss heat safety precautions with members of your household.
  • Check the contents of your emergency disaster kit in case a power outage occurs.
  • Be aware of weather forecasts and the upcoming temperature changes.
  • It’s not just the high temperature. The heat index is the temperature the body feels when the effects of heat and humidity are combined. See our heat index chart.
  • A backhome home generator is the safest and most reliable solution!  Power outages are common during heatwaves because the need for A/C puts too much pressure on the power grids. A standby generator, however, automatically keeps the A/C running, the lights on, food and medicine from spoiling, and medical devices operating.

During the Heat Wave

  • Use box fans and ceiling fans to promote air circulation throughout your home. Opening doors in the house and using box fans to push hot air outdoors can function as an "exhaust" system and draw cooler evening air into the house. In the cooler evenings, open all windows and promote as much air circulation as possible.
  • Take advantage of the cooling power of water. Wet towels and bandannas can have a cooling effect when worn on the shoulders or head. Consider using a spray bottle filled with cold water for refreshing spritzes throughout the day.
  • Head downstairs. Since hot air rises, the upper stories of a home will be warmer than the ground floor. A basement can be a cool refuge from the midday heat.
  • Eliminate extra sources of heat. Incandescent light bulbs can generate unnecessary heat, as can computers or appliances left running. Eat fresh foods that do not require you to use the oven or stove to prepare.
  • Remember to maintain an adequate level of hydration, which means you'll need to consume more water than you usually do when it's hot. Thirst is the first sign of dehydration; you should drink sufficient amounts of fluids before you feel thirsty in order to prevent dehydration
  • For a homemade "air conditioning" system, sit in the path of a box fan that is aimed at an open cooler, or pan filled with ice.

https://www.medicinenet.com/11_tips_surviving_a_heat_wave/views.htm

https://www.almanac.com/content/heat-waves-10-tips-extreme-heat-safety

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